Identity thieves increasingly target tax professionals. A thief who breaches the data of one tax return preparer can gain hundreds or thousands of taxpayers' data. One way you can monitor for suspicious activity is to check how many federal tax returns have been filed with your Electronic Filing Identification Number (EFIN).

As part of the ongoing concerns about security and identity theft, the IRS recommends that you verify the number of returns submitted under your EFIN. Do this routinely and especially during filing season.

Verify your EFIN through IRS e-Services. If you do not have an e-Services account, then your first step would be to go to e-Services and register for an account.

Once you have logged into your e-Services account, follow these steps to verify the number of returns electronically filed with the IRS:

  1. Select your name,
  2. In the left banner, select 'Application',
  3. In the left banner, select 'e-File Application',
  4. Select your name again,
  5. In the listing, select 'EFIN Status' and on this screen you can see the number of returns filed based on return type.

Help safeguard your EFIN. During the filing season, check on your EFIN status to ensure that it is not being used by others. Your e-Services account will give you the number of returns the IRS received, which you can match to your records. The statistics are updated weekly. Please contact the IRS e-help Desk at 866-255-0654 if you see a significantly higher volume than you transmitted.

For more information on EFINs, Publication 3112, IRS e-file Application and Participation, provides participation requirements and necessary steps to obtain an EFIN. Publication 1345, Handbook for Authorized IRS e-file Providers of Individual Income Tax Returns, provides rules and requirements for participation in IRS e-file involving individual income tax returns and related forms and schedules.

This is one in a series of special security awareness tax tips for tax professionals. The "Protect Your Clients; Protect Yourself" campaign's goal is to raise awareness among tax professionals. It is an initiative of the Security Summit, a joint project by the IRS, states and the tax community to combat identity theft. Because of the sensitive client data held by tax professionals, cybercriminals increasingly are targeting the tax preparation community.

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Upcoming Tax Dates

October 9 — Everyone
Federal Holiday (Columbus Day) - Details

October 11 — Employees who work for tips
If you received $20 or more in tips during September, report them to your employer - Details

October 15 — Individuals
If you have an automatic 6-month extension to file your income tax return for 2017, file Form 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ and pay any tax, interest, and penalties due - Details

October 15 — Corporations
File a 2017 calendar year income tax return (Form 1120) and pay any tax, interest, and penalties due. This due date applies only if you timely requested an automatic 6-month extension Details

October 15 — Partnerships
Electing large partnerships: File a 2017 calendar year return (Form 1065-B). This due date applies only if you were given an additional 6-month extension - Details

October 15 — Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax
If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in September.

October 31 — Certain small employers
Deposit any undeposited tax if your tax liability is $2,500 or more for 2017 but less than $2,500 for the third quarter.

October 31 — Federal unemployment tax
Deposit the tax owed through 09-if more than $500.

October 31 — Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax.
File Form 941 for the third quarter of 2018. Deposit or pay any undeposited tax under the accuracy of deposit rules .If your tax liability is less than $2,500, you can pay it in full with a timely filed return. If you deposited the tax for the quarter timely, properly, and in full, you have until 11-10 to file the return.

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