The IRS normally sends correspondence in the mail. We mail millions of letters to taxpayers every year. Keep these important points in mind if you get a letter or notice:

  • Don't Ignore It. You can respond to most IRS notices quickly and easily.
  • Follow Instructions. Read the notice carefully. It will tell you if you need to take any action. Be sure to follow the instructions. The letter will also have contact information if you have questions.
  • Focus on the Issue. IRS notices usually deal with a specific issue about your tax return or tax account. Your notice or letter will explain the reason for the contact and give you instructions on how to handle the issue. You can learn more about your notice or letter on IRS.gov.
  • Correction Notice. If the IRS corrected your tax return, you should review the information provided and compare it to your tax return.

If you agree, you don't need to reply unless a payment is due.

If you don't agree, it's important that you respond. Follow the instructions on the notice for the best way to respond to us. You may be able to call us to resolve the issue. Have a copy of your tax return and the notice with you when you call. If you choose to write to us, be sure to include information and any documents you want us to consider. Also, write your taxpayer identification number (Social Security number, employer identification number or individual taxpayer identification number) on each page of the letter you send. Mail your reply to the address shown on the notice. Allow at least 30 days for a response.

  • Respond to Requests about the Premium Tax Credit. The IRS may send you a letter asking you to clarify or verify your premium tax credit information. You should follow the instructions on the letter. For more information about these letters, see the Understanding Your Letter 0012C page on IRS.gov/aca.
  • You Don't Need to Visit the IRS. You can handle most notices without visiting the IRS. If you have questions, call the phone number in the upper right corner of the notice. Have a copy of your tax return and the notice when you call.
  • Keep the Notice. Keep a copy of the IRS notice with your tax records.
  • Watch Out for Scams. Don't fall for phone and phishing email scams that use the IRS as a lure. We will contact you about unpaid taxes by mail first — not by phone. Be aware that the IRS does not initiate contact with taxpayers by email, text or social media.

IRS Tax Tips provide valuable information throughout the year. IRS.gov offers tax help and info on various topics including common tax scams, taxpayer rights and more.

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September 2017
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Upcoming Tax Dates

September 5 — Everyone
Federal Holiday (Labor Day) Details

September 10 — Communications and air transportation taxes under the alternative method.
Deposit the tax included in amounts billed or tickets sold during the first 15 days of August.

September 11 — Employees who work for tips
If you received $20 or more in tips during August, report them to your employer Details

September 14 — Regular method taxes
Deposit the tax included in amounts billed or tickets sold during the last 16 days of August.

September 15 — Individuals
Make a payment of your 2017 estimated tax if you are not paying your income tax for the year through withholding (or will not pay in enough tax that way). Use Form 1040-ES. This is the third installment Details

September 15 — S Corporations
File a 2016 calendar year income tax return (Form 1120S) and pay any tax due. This due date applies only if you timely requested an automatic 6-month extension Details

September 15 — Partnerships
File a 2016 calendar year return (Form 1065). This due date applies only if you were given an additional 5-month extension Details

September 15 — Corporations
Deposit the third installment of estimated income tax for 2016 Details

September 15 — Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax
If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in August.

September 15 — Nonpayroll withholding
If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in August.

September 27 — Communications and air transportation taxes under the alternative method.
Deposit the tax included in amounts billed or tickets sold during the last 16 days of August.

September 29 — Regular method taxes
Deposit the tax for the first 15 days of September.

September 29 — Regular method taxes (special September deposit rule)
Deposit the tax for the period beginning September 16 and ending September 26.

September 29 — Communications and air transportation taxes under the alternative method (special September deposit rule).
Deposit the tax included in amounts billed or tickets sold during the period beginning September 1 and ending September 11.

September 30 — Wagering tax
File Form 730 and pay the tax on wagers accepted during August.

View More Tax Dates