The Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit can reduce the taxes you pay. If you paid someone to care for a person in your household last year while you worked or looked for work, then read on for facts from the IRS about this important tax credit:

  1. Child, Dependent or Spouse. You may be able to claim the credit if you paid someone to care for your child, dependent or spouse last year.
  2. Work-Related Expense. The care must have been necessary so you could work or look for work. If you are married, the care also must have been necessary so your spouse could work or look for work. This rule does not apply if your spouse was disabled or a full–time student.
  3. Qualifying Person. The care must have been for "qualifying persons." A qualifying person can be your child under age 13. A qualifying person can also be your spouse or dependent who lived with you for more than half the year and is physically or mentally incapable of self-care.
  4. Earned Income. You must have earned income for the year, such as wages from a job. If you are married and file a joint tax return, your spouse must also have earned income. Special rules apply to a spouse who is a student or disabled.
  5. Credit Percentage / Expense Limits. The credit is worth between 20 and 35 percent of your allowable expenses. The percentage depends on the amount of your income. Your allowable expenses are limited to $3,000 if you paid for the care of one qualifying person. The limit is $6,000 if you paid for the care of two or more.
  6. Dependent Care Benefits. If your employer gives you dependent care benefits, special rules apply. For more on these rules see Form 2441, Child and Dependent Care Expenses.
  7. Qualifying Person's SSN. You must include the Social Security Number of each qualifying person to claim the credit.
  8. Care Provider Information. You must include the name, address and taxpayer identification number of your care provider on your tax return.
  9. Form 2441. You file Form 2441 with your tax return to claim the credit.

See Publication 503, Child and Dependent Care Expenses, for more on this topic. You can get it on IRS.gov/forms anytime.

TaxAct asks simple questions to help you maximize your deductions and credits related to children and dependents. Start your TaxAct Free Edition return now to prepare, print and e-file your federal tax return free!

Additional IRS Resources:

  • Topic 602 - Child and Dependent Care Credit
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Upcoming Tax Dates

August 1 — Certain small employers
Deposit any undeposited tax if your tax liability is $2,500 or more for 2017 but less than $2,500 for the second quarter.

August 1 — Federal unemployment tax
Deposit the tax owed through 06-if more than $500.

August 1 — All employers
If you maintain an employee benefit plan, such as a pension, profitsharing, or stock bonus plan, file Form 5500 or 5500EZ for calendar year 2017. If you use a fiscal year as your plan year, file the form by the last day of the seventh month after the plan year ends.

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If you received $20 or more in tips during July, report them to your employer Details

August 10 — Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax
File Form 941 for the second quarter of 2018. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the quarter timely, properly, and in full.

August 15 — Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax
If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in July.

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