Some taxpayers may be liable for an Additional Medicare Tax if your income exceeds certain limits. Here are six things that you should know about this tax:

  • Tax Rate. The Additional Medicare Tax rate is 0.9 percent.
  • Income Subject to Tax. The tax applies to the amount of certain income that is more than a threshold amount. The types of income include your Medicare wages, self-employment income and railroad retirement (RRTA) compensation. You must combine your wages and self-employment income to figure the tax. You do not consider a loss from self-employment purposes of this tax. You compare RRTA compensation separately to the threshold. See the instructions for Form 8959, Additional Medicare Tax, for more on these rules.
  • Threshold Amount. You base your threshold amount on your filing status. If you are married and file a joint return, you must combine your spouse's wages, compensation, or self-employment income with yours. Use the combined total to determine if your income exceeds your threshold. The threshold amounts are:
  • Filing Status Threshold Amount
    Married filing jointly $250,000
    Married filing separately $125,000
    Single $200,000
    Head of household $200,000
    Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child $200,000
  • Withholding / Estimated Tax. Employers must withhold this tax from your wages or compensation when they pay you more than $200,000 in a calendar year. If you are self-employed you should include this tax when you figure your estimated tax liability.
  • Underpayment of Estimated Tax. If you had too little tax withheld, or did not pay enough estimated tax, you may owe an estimated tax penalty. For more on this topic, see Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax.

If you owe this tax, file Form 8959, with your tax return. You also report any Additional Medicare Tax withheld by your employer on Form 8959. Visit IRS.gov for more on this topic.

Additional IRS Resources:

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Upcoming Tax Dates

October 9 — Everyone
Federal Holiday (Columbus Day) - Details

October 11 — Employees who work for tips
If you received $20 or more in tips during September, report them to your employer - Details

October 15 — Individuals
If you have an automatic 6-month extension to file your income tax return for 2017, file Form 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ and pay any tax, interest, and penalties due - Details

October 15 — Corporations
File a 2017 calendar year income tax return (Form 1120) and pay any tax, interest, and penalties due. This due date applies only if you timely requested an automatic 6-month extension Details

October 15 — Partnerships
Electing large partnerships: File a 2017 calendar year return (Form 1065-B). This due date applies only if you were given an additional 6-month extension - Details

October 15 — Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax
If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in September.

October 31 — Certain small employers
Deposit any undeposited tax if your tax liability is $2,500 or more for 2017 but less than $2,500 for the third quarter.

October 31 — Federal unemployment tax
Deposit the tax owed through 09-if more than $500.

October 31 — Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax.
File Form 941 for the third quarter of 2018. Deposit or pay any undeposited tax under the accuracy of deposit rules .If your tax liability is less than $2,500, you can pay it in full with a timely filed return. If you deposited the tax for the quarter timely, properly, and in full, you have until 11-10 to file the return.

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