If you make a mistake on your tax return, it can take longer to process, which in turn, may delay your refund. Here are eight common errors to avoid.

  1. Incorrect or missing Social Security numbers When entering SSNs for anyone listed on your tax return, be sure to enter them exactly as they appear on the Social Security cards.
  2. Incorrect or misspelling of dependent's last name When entering a dependent's last name on your tax return, make sure to enter it exactly as it appears on their Social Security card.
  3. Filing status errors Choose the correct filing status for your situation. There are five filing statuses: Single, Married Filing Jointly, Married Filing Separately, Head of Household and Qualifying Widow(er) With Dependent Child. See Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction and Filing Information, to determine the filing status that best fits your situation.
  4. Math errors When preparing paper returns, review all math for accuracy. Or file electronically; the software does the math for you!
  5. Computation errors Take your time. Many taxpayers make mistakes when figuring their taxable income, withholding and estimated tax payments, Earned Income Tax Credit, Standard Deduction for age 65 or over or blind, the taxable amount of Social Security benefits and the Child and Dependent Care Credit.
  6. Incorrect bank account numbers for direct deposit Double check your bank routing and account numbers if you are using direct deposit for your refund.
  7. Forgetting to sign and date the return An unsigned tax return is like an unsigned check – it is invalid. Also, both spouses must sign a joint return.
  8. Incorrect adjusted gross income If you file electronically, you must sign the return electronically using a Personal Identification Number. To verify your identity, the software will prompt you to enter your AGI from your originally filed 2010 federal income tax return or last year's PIN if you e-filed. Taxpayers should not use an AGI amount from an amended return, Form 1040X, or a math-error correction made by IRS.

TaxACT does the math and computations for you, and walks you through the e-filing steps to easily identify your prior year AGI or PIN.

If you used TaxACT last year, use TaxACT Deluxe to import last year's return data, including SSNs, dependent names, filing status and prior year AGI or PIN. Start your return risk-free now!


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Upcoming Tax Dates

October 10 — Everyone
Federal Holiday (Columbus Day) - Details

October 11 — Employees who work for tips
If you received $20 or more in tips during September, report them to your employer - Details

October 13 — Communications and air transportation taxes under the alternative method (special September deposit rule).
Deposit the tax included in amounts billed or tickets sold during the period beginning September 12 and ending September 15.

October 14 — Regular method taxes (special September deposit rule).
Deposit the tax for the last 4 days of September.

October 17 — Individuals
If you have an automatic 6-month extension to file your income tax return for 2015, file Form 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ and pay any tax, interest, and penalties due - Details

October 17 — Partnerships
Electing large partnerships: File a 2015 calendar year return (Form 1065-B). This due date applies only if you were given an additional 6-month extension - Details

October 17 — Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax
If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in September.

October 17 — Nonpayroll withholding
If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in September.

October 26 — Communications and air transportation taxes under the alternative method.
Deposit the tax included in amounts billed or tickets sold during the last 15 days of September.

October 28 — Regular method taxes
Deposit the tax for the first 15 days in October.

October 31 — Certain small employers
Deposit any undeposited tax if your tax liability is $2,500 or more for 2016 but less than $2,500 for the third quarter.

October 31 — Federal unemployment tax
Deposit the tax owed through September if more than $500.

October 31 — Form 720 taxes.
File Form 720 for the third quarter of 2016.

October 31 — Wagering tax
File Form 730 and pay the tax on wagers accepted during September.

October 31 — Heavy highway vehicle tax
File Form 2290 and pay the tax for vehicles first used in September.

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