The IRS Fresh Start program makes it easier for taxpayers to pay back taxes and avoid tax liens. Even small business taxpayers may benefit from Fresh Start. Here are three important features of the Fresh Start program:

  • Tax Liens. The Fresh Start program increased the amount that taxpayers can owe before the IRS generally will file a Notice of Federal Tax Lien. That amount is now $10,000. However, in some cases, the IRS may still file a lien notice on amounts less than $10,000.

    When a taxpayer meets certain requirements and pays off their tax debt, the IRS may now withdraw a filed Notice of Federal Tax Lien. Taxpayers must request this in writing using Form 12277, Application for Withdrawal.

    Some taxpayers may qualify to have their lien notice withdrawn if they are paying their tax debt through a Direct Debit installment agreement. Taxpayers also need to request this in writing by using Form 12277.

    If a taxpayer defaults on the Direct Debit Installment Agreement, the IRS may file a new Notice of Federal Tax Lien and resume collection actions.
  • Installment Agreements. The Fresh Start program expanded access to streamlined installment agreements. Now, individual taxpayers who owe up to $50,000 can pay through monthly direct debit payments for up to 72 months (six years). While the IRS generally will not need a financial statement, they may need some financial information from the taxpayer. The easiest way to apply for a payment plan is to use the Online Payment Agreement tool at IRS.gov. If you don't have Web access you may file Form 9465, Installment Agreement, to apply.

    Taxpayers in need of installment agreements for tax debts more than $50,000 or longer than six years still need to provide the IRS with a financial statement. In these cases, the IRS may ask for one of two forms: either Collection Information Statement, Form 433-A or Form 433-F.
  • Offers in Compromise. An Offer in Compromise is an agreement that allows taxpayers to settle their tax debt for less than the full amount. Fresh Start expanded and streamlined the OIC program. The IRS now has more flexibility when analyzing a taxpayer's ability to pay. This makes the offer program available to a larger group of taxpayers.

    Generally, the IRS will accept an offer if it represents the most the agency can expect to collect within a reasonable period of time. The IRS will not accept an offer if it believes that the taxpayer can pay the amount owed in full as a lump sum or through a payment agreement. The IRS looks at several factors, including the taxpayer's income and assets, to make a decision regarding the taxpayer's ability to pay. Use the Offer in Compromise Pre-Qualifier tool on IRS.gov to see if you may be eligible for an OIC.

Additional IRS Resources:

IRS YouTube Videos:

  • Online Payment Agreement - English

IRS Podcasts:

  • Online Payment Agreement - English
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Upcoming Tax Dates

July 1 Occupational excise taxes
File Form 11C to register and pay the annual tax if you are in the business of accepting wagers.

July 4 Everyone
Federal Holiday (Independence Day) - Details

July 10 Employees who work for tips
If you received $20 or more in tips during June, report them to your employer - Details

July 10 Communications and air transportation taxes under the alternative method
Deposit the tax included in amounts billed or tickets sold during the first 15 days of June.

July 14 Regular method taxes
Deposit the tax for the last 15 days of June.

July 15 Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax
If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in June.

July 15 Nonpayroll withholding
If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in June.

July 27 Communications and air transportation taxes under the alternative method
Deposit the tax included in amounts billed or tickets sold during the last 15 days of June.

July 29 Regular method taxes
Deposit the tax for the first 15 days of July.

July 31 Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax
File Form 941 for the second quarter of 2015. Deposit or pay any undeposited tax under the accuracy of deposit rules.

July 31 Certain small employers
Deposit any undeposited tax if your tax liability is $2,500 or more for 2015 but less than $2,500 for the second quarter.

July 31 Federal unemployment tax
Deposit the tax owed through June if more than $500.

July 31 All employers
If you maintain an employee benefit plan, such as a pension, profitsharing, or stock bonus plan, file Form 5500 or 5500EZ for calendar year 2014. If you use a fiscal year as your plan year, file the form by the last day of the seventh month after the plan year ends.

July 31 Form 720 taxes
File Form 720 for the second quarter of 2015.

July 31 Wagering tax
File Form 730 and pay the tax on wagers accepted during June.

July 31 Heavy highway vehicle use tax
File Form 2290 and pay the tax for vehicles first used in June.

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