Each year, millions of taxpayers choose whether to take the standard deduction or to itemize their deductions. The following seven facts from the IRS can help you choose the method that gives you the lowest tax.

  1. Qualifying expenses - Whether to itemize deductions on your tax return depends on how much you spent on certain expenses last year. If the total amount you spent on qualifying medical care, mortgage interest, taxes, charitable contributions, casualty losses and miscellaneous deductions is more than your standard deduction, you can usually benefit by itemizing.
  2. Standard deduction amounts - Your standard deduction is based on your filing status and is subject to inflation adjustments each year. For 2011, the amounts are:
    • Single $5,800
    • Married Filing Jointly $11,600
    • Head of Household $8,500
    • Married Filing Separately $5,800
    • Qualifying Widow(er) $11,600
  3. Some taxpayers have different standard deductions - The standard deduction amount depends on your filing status, whether you are 65 or older or blind and whether another taxpayer can claim an exemption for you. If any of these apply, use the Standard Deduction Worksheet on the back of Form 1040EZ, or in the 1040A or 1040 instructions.
  4. Limited itemized deductions - Your itemized deductions are no longer limited because of your adjusted gross income.
  5. Married filing separately - When a married couple files separate returns and one spouse itemizes deductions, the other spouse cannot claim the standard deduction and therefore must itemize to claim their allowable deductions.
  6. Some taxpayers are not eligible for the standard deduction - They include nonresident aliens, dual-status aliens and individuals who file returns for periods of less than 12 months due to a change in accounting periods.
  7. Forms to use - The standard deduction can be taken on Forms 1040, 1040A or 1040EZ. To itemize your deductions, use Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, and Schedule A, Itemized Deductions.

These forms and instructions may be downloaded from the IRS website at www.irs.gov or ordered by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

TaxACT helps determine whether you benefit more by claiming the standard deduction or itemizing your deductions. TaxACT Free Federal Edition includes all e-fileable forms and schedules for simple and complex taxes, including Forms 1040, 1040A and 1040EZ, as well as Schedule A for itemized deductions. Start your TaxACT Free Federal Edition return now.

Links:

  • Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax (PDF)
  • Schedule A, Itemized Deductions (PDF)
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Upcoming Tax Dates

August 10 Employees who work for tips
If you received $20 or more in tips during July, report them to your employer - Details

August 10 Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax
File Form 941 for the second quarter of 2015. This due date applies only if you deposited the tax for the quarter timely, properly, and in full.

August 12 Communications and air transportation taxes under the alternative method.
Deposit the tax included in amounts billed or tickets sold during the first 15 days of July.

August 14 Regular method taxes
Deposit the tax for the last 16 days of July.

August 17 Social security, Medicare, and withheld income tax
If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in July.

August 17 Nonpayroll withholding
If the monthly deposit rule applies, deposit the tax for payments in July.

August 26 Communications and air transportation taxes under the alternative method.
Deposit the tax included in amounts billed or tickets sold during the last 16 days of July.

August 28 Regular method taxes
Deposit the tax for the first 15 days of August.

August 31 Heavy highway vehicle use tax
File Form 2290 and pay the tax for vehicles first used in July.

August 31 Wagering tax
File Form 730 and pay the tax on wagers accepted during July.

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