Determining your filing status is one of the first steps to filing your federal income tax return. There are five filing statuses: Single, Married Filing Jointly, Married Filing Separately, Head of Household and Qualifying Widow(er) with Dependent Child. Your filing status is used to determine your filing requirements, standard deduction, eligibility for certain credits and deductions, and your correct tax.

Some people may qualify for more than one filing status. Here are eight facts about filing status that the IRS wants you to know so you can choose the best option for your situation.

  1. Your marital status on the last day of the year determines your marital status for the entire year.
  2. If more than one filing status applies to you, choose the one that gives you the lowest tax obligation.
  3. Single filing status generally applies to anyone who is unmarried, divorced or legally separated according to state law.
  4. A married couple may file a joint return together. The couple's filing status would be Married Filing Jointly.
  5. If your spouse died during the year and you did not remarry during 2011, usually you may still file a joint return with that spouse for the year of death.
  6. A married couple may elect to file their returns separately. Each person's filing status would generally be Married Filing Separately.
  7. Head of Household generally applies to taxpayers who are unmarried. You must also have paid more than half the cost of maintaining a home for you and a qualifying person to qualify for this filing status.
  8. You may be able to choose Qualifying Widow(er) with Dependent Child as your filing status if your spouse died during 2009 or 2010, you have a dependent child, have not remarried and you meet certain other conditions.

There's much more information about determining your filing status in IRS Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information. Publication 501 is available at www.irs.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676). You can also use the Interactive Tax Assistant on the IRS website to determine your filing status. The ITA tool is a tax law resource on the IRS website that takes you through a series of questions and provides you with responses to tax law questions.

Are you married and unsure about whether to file separately or jointly? The Joint vs. Separate Report in TaxACT Deluxe shows you which filing status provides the biggest tax savings. The Joint vs. Separate Report is just one of many advanced features & reports in TaxACT Deluxe. Try TaxACT Online Deluxe with Joint vs. Separate Report risk-free now and pay $9.95 when you're ready to print or e-file.

Links:

April 2014
S M T W T F S
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30      

Upcoming Tax Dates

April 10 (Employees who work for tips)
If you received $20 or more in tips during March, report them to your employer - Details

April 15 (Individuals)
File a 2013 income tax return (Form 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ) and pay any tax due - Details

April 15 (Household Employers)
If you paid cash wages of $1,800 or more in 2013 to a household employee, you must file Schedule H - Details

April 15 (Individuals)
If you are not paying your 2014 income tax through withholding (or will not pay in enough tax during the year that way), pay the first installment of your 2014 estimated tax. Use Form 1040-ES - Details

April 15 (Partnerships)
File a 2013 calendar year return (Form 1065) - Details

April 15 (Partnerships)
Electing large partnerships: File a 2013 calendar year return (Form 1065-B) - Details

April 15 (Corporations)
Deposit the first installment of estimated income tax for 2014 - Details

April 16 (Everyone)
Federal Holiday (District of Columbia Emancipation Day) - Details

View More Tax Dates